Loaded with Style – Architalks #23 Style

This month's Architalk topic is "style." Before reading too far into this post, don't get me wrong, I think the discussion topic of 'style' is great. It needs to be flushed out of my system, and I have nothing against style or a particular style, but it's what the word implies that can get me worked up.

"Style," is a loaded word in my opinion. From a lay person, it's probably one of the first questions I get asked as an architect, "what's style do you design in, what is your favorite style?" 

I'm here today to tell you that I could almost care less about that kind of style. I appreciate most styles of architecture, but I'm much more into the character of architecture and good design, rather than what style a building is. For example, we've designed homes in a craftsmen style, mediterranean style, we've done additions to Eichlers, and even changed the style of a house at the owners request – but what's important to us, is how well the users can use and interact with the building, and in some cases, how well the building works with people that have to pass by it on a day to day basis. Architecture is not underwear. You can't design it just for you and think you're the only one that's important, the only one that's going to see it. Architecture is a public statement in most cases, and you have to keep in mind the public will see and interact with it too.

"Architecture is not underwear. You can't design it just for you and think you're the only one that's important, the only one that's going to see it..."

"Architecture is not underwear. You can't design it just for you and think you're the only one that's important, the only one that's going to see it..."

Style almost implies a sense of temporary inclusion. "That's so 90's style." "That's like the style of Frank Lloyd Wright." These are moments in time, not long-lasting pillars of design. The style of a house can change, but the layout and fundamentals of Architecture will last a building's lifetime.

Even Frank Lloyd Wright designed in several different 'styles' believe it or not. Do yourself a favor and go listen to 99% Invisible's episode on Usonia.

Even Frank Lloyd Wright designed in several different 'styles' believe it or not. Do yourself a favor and go listen to 99% Invisible's episode on Usonia.

When we get asked what style we design in, we say, "we design in all styles, but the style that is best for you, and the style that is best for the building." 


Brian Paletz - The Emerging Architect (@bpaletz)
You do you

Bob Borson - Life of An Architect (@bobborson)
http://www.lifeofanarchitect.com/style-do-i-have-any/

Lee Calisti, AIA - Think Architect (@LeeCalisti)
style...final words

Lora Teagarden - L² Design, LLC (@L2DesignLLC)
The AREsketches Style

Collier Ward - One More Story (@BuildingContent)
Good Artists Copy; Great Artists Steal

Eric T. Faulkner - Rock Talk (@wishingrockhome)
Name That Stile!

brady ernst - Soapbox Architect (@bradyernstAIA)
What Style Do You Build In?

Michael LaValley - Evolving Architect (@archivalley)
Defining an Architect's Style

Jarod Hall - di'velept (@divelept)
What's Your Style?

Greg Croft - Sage Leaf Group (@croft_gregory)
Architectural Style

Jeffrey Pelletier - Board & Vellum (@boardandvellum)
Should You Pick Your Architect Based on Style or Service?

Samantha R. Markham - The Aspiring Architect (@TheAspiringArch)
5 Styles of an Aspiring Architect

Nisha Kandiah - ArchiDragon (@ArchiDragon)
Regression or Evolution : Style

Keith Palma - Architect's Trace (@cogitatedesign)
Stylized Hatred

Jim Mehaffey - Yeoman Architect (@jamesmehaffey)
What's in a Style?

Mark Stephens - Mark Stephens Architects (@architectmark)
Architectalks 23 - Style